World Class Maintenance

The Stores Stock Committee: Straightening Roads & Leveling Mountains

For this month’s blog, we are going to slow down just a little and spend some time discussing a nuance that will be critical for the storeroom to successfully advance fromeffective to efficient. For this transformation, we must have an active support structure to provide guidance, oversight, and clout, essentially straightening roads and leveling the mountains of obstacles that might impede progress.

Companies that have ventured into Total Process Reliability (TPR) with Marshall Institute will recognize the support structure necessity as being step 3 of the 8-phase change model.

Introduction to World Class Inventory Management

Welcome and thanks for visiting! This is the first edition in a 12-month series of blog entries, designed to discuss and explain high level storeroom performance. It should also help create a compelling case for change at your plant or location.


I’ll be writing a blog every month covering key challenges and discussions around Storeroom and Materials Management.  I welcome you to review the material and to comment below and let us know your experiences, thoughts, and points of view. Let’s have a conversation and some robust dialogue on this very important subject.

What does World Class mean?

As a reliability consultant, I use the term “World Class” often, and if you’ve had consultants in your facility or gone to any outside training, you’ve no doubt heard this phrase. It’s likely that our earliest exposure to the term came from the world of sports, as Olympians are said to be world class athletes. The Olympic motto “Citius, Altius, Fortius” convinces us that the participants are those among us who are “Faster, Higher, Stronger.”

Where to Start? Building a World Class MRO Process

In practice, it’s easier to ‘build’ a world class MRO process from one that is mature and functioning, rather than from scratch.  Consider your process that has been inefficiently working for years; delivery both poor service and great inconvenience.  This is truly a more enviable position than starting with an empty warehouse.

Why?  Think of all the great examples you already have of “how not to do something”.  Thomas Edison so cleverly stated that he didn’t have thousands of failed experiments when creating a light bulb; he just learned 10,000 ways not to do it.

We’ll save you 9,991 attempts by giving you a 9 step outline to use in building a world class MRO process.   It’s like flipping a switch; after all, what could be easier?

Step 1:  Conduct a parts needs analysis