Video

Sustaining TPM: Develop a Strategy

The final video in the Sustaining TPM series reviews the importance of establishing a both a short and long term strategy.   Creating a clear strategy plan is vital for any long term improvement effort to be sustained.  Studies such as the AT Kearney study and results from the NAME award recipients (North American Maintenance Excellence) show that the best of the best have both a 1 and 5 year strategy plans.

Greg highlights key elements for developing a sustainable strategy:

Sustaining TPM: Build Internal Expertise

So far, in the Sustaining TPM video series we have discussed the importance of gaining consensus on strengths and opportunities and building a persuasive case for change. This next and equally important topic is building internal expertise

For those currently embarking on your TPM implementation journey, let's assume you have successfully executed the first two steps. This means that your peers and management team are on board with the need for Total Productive Maintenance and also the current areas for opportunities that exist at your site. With this momentum built, it is vital to utilize individuals who are able and willing to drive the process. This is the step of building internal expertise.

On your journey you will require the sponsorship of corporate and you may seek the services of a consulting company; however valuable these people are, they cannot sustain your process. Sustaining the process comes from a sense of ownership, and this has to be developed at the shop floor.

 

Sustaining TPM: How to Gain Consensus

What does an organization have to do in order to take the first step to achieve sustained reliability improvement? Here at Marshall Institute, we believe that this is to assess the organization's current state and gain consensus on strengths and opportunities.

Greg Folts covers this topic in the second video in our Sustaining TPM series. He discusses the importance of gaining consensus in sustaining TPM improvement and identifies proven methods to achieve consensus. These are:

Sustaining TPM: 4 Steps for Success

Change is inevitable, just like death and taxes :). Accepting this is the first step to successfully managing and sustaining change.

Successfully managing and sustaining Total Productive Maintenance / Total Process Reliability implementation in a manufacturing environment is difficult, but there are proven steps that will guide your journey and, if followed, will support your success.  In this asset maintenance management video blog series, Greg Folts discusses four key steps necessary for managing a successful TPM implementation.

The steps are:

TPM Video Series: Labeling Tip for better Visual Controls

In today's video I cover a cost-effective and quick-to-implement tactic that extends the life of equipment labels.

Often equipment labels become unfixed, scrapped and tattered due to the daily wear of plant life. These labels are important visual aids for operators and maintenance technicians and must be easy to read and clearly visible.  Extending the life cycle of these labels becomes an important element of equipment reliability. Applying clear boxing tape over the labels will increase the adhesion surface area to protect labels from oil, lube, moisture; anything that could contaminate or destroy the labels. These are the two quick steps to improve the life cycle of your equipment labels:

TPM Series: Defect Tagging as a Visual Control

Defect Tags are great tools and visual aids for both operations and maintenance to use to identify equipment defects.

The 2 key advantages of Defect Tagging are:

  1. Other operators and maintenance people can see that a defect has been identified and that a work order has been created.
  2. When a work order has been made, and the repair planned and scheduled, the maintenance mechanic can see exactly where the defect is located on the piece of equipment.

In addition to Defect Tags, there are Opportunity Tags. These tags, colored differently from Defect Tags, highlight areas of improvement on a piece of equipment. Opportunities are not issues that are a concern for equipment reliability; they are ways to optimize the equipment for maintenance work or operation.

TPM Video Series: Using Transparency Sheets to Increase Reliability

TPM colored transparency sheets are great tools to identify normal equipment operating conditions from abnormal.

My short instructional video outlines how to use TPM transparency sheets as a visual control to mark the normal operating range for a gauge.  The value of the gauge marking is that it provides a very clear and quick way for operators to identify if equipment is running properly or not.  This knowledge allows an operator to act quickly in the event that equipment is not running properly. Such as fast response may prevent a large failure from occuring.

If you are not currently using TPM transparency sheets as visual controls you should strongly consider it.  For such a small investment the results can be significant. Check out the video below and start using transparency sheets today!