Sustaining Maintenance

Sustaining TPM: Develop a Strategy

The final video in the Sustaining TPM series reviews the importance of establishing a both a short and long term strategy.   Creating a clear strategy plan is vital for any long term improvement effort to be sustained.  Studies such as the AT Kearney study and results from the NAME award recipients (North American Maintenance Excellence) show that the best of the best have both a 1 and 5 year strategy plans.

Greg highlights key elements for developing a sustainable strategy:

Sustaining TPM: Build Internal Expertise

So far, in the Sustaining TPM video series we have discussed the importance of gaining consensus on strengths and opportunities and building a persuasive case for change. This next and equally important topic is building internal expertise

For those currently embarking on your TPM implementation journey, let's assume you have successfully executed the first two steps. This means that your peers and management team are on board with the need for Total Productive Maintenance and also the current areas for opportunities that exist at your site. With this momentum built, it is vital to utilize individuals who are able and willing to drive the process. This is the step of building internal expertise.

On your journey you will require the sponsorship of corporate and you may seek the services of a consulting company; however valuable these people are, they cannot sustain your process. Sustaining the process comes from a sense of ownership, and this has to be developed at the shop floor.

 

Sustaining TPM: How to Gain Consensus

What does an organization have to do in order to take the first step to achieve sustained reliability improvement? Here at Marshall Institute, we believe that this is to assess the organization's current state and gain consensus on strengths and opportunities.

Greg Folts covers this topic in the second video in our Sustaining TPM series. He discusses the importance of gaining consensus in sustaining TPM improvement and identifies proven methods to achieve consensus. These are:

Sustaining TPM: 4 Steps for Success

Change is inevitable, just like death and taxes :). Accepting this is the first step to successfully managing and sustaining change.

Successfully managing and sustaining Total Productive Maintenance / Total Process Reliability implementation in a manufacturing environment is difficult, but there are proven steps that will guide your journey and, if followed, will support your success.  In this asset maintenance management video blog series, Greg Folts discusses four key steps necessary for managing a successful TPM implementation.

The steps are: