8 Warning Signs Your CMMS Vendor Is Neglecting Their Software


Guest Blog Contribution:

Marshall Institute is always looking to publish great industry relevant blog content and we are proud to have todays blog post come from MicroMain Corporation. MicroMain provides award-winning maintenance and facility management software and services to organizations worldwide.  Learn more aboutMicroMain.  

If you are interested in contributing valuable and relevent industry information to Marshall Institute's blog please contact us.  



Your organization thrives by adapting to industry changes. Why shouldn’t that be true of your computerized maintenance management system (CMMS)?

Design for Reliability - Part 4 of 4

 

While senior management may embrace the reliability philosophy, their bias may lean towards the profit objective than the maintenance and failure prevention objective, which is associated with costs not profits.  If there is opportunity to influence the design, especially in a retrofit, expansion, or brownfield, then that’s one of the best places to start in cost reduction of maintenance.   If not, an alternative may be with the influence of the management of accounting or finance departments.

In some cases the financial and/or accounting department reports that show the maintenance costs incurred over the life of the equipment exceeds the initial cost. Reliability unfortunately becomes known as a band aid and not a cure for availability.  While reliability is not the cure all, it can be a contribution to reducing overall life cycle costs.   The following is some tips for you to work with your management in properly evaluating what the results of you LCCA, Life Cycle Cost Analysis, means from a reliability perspective.     

By involving yourself in the life cycle cost analysis management is loaded with qualitative data such as:

Design for Reliability - Part 3 of 4

What does the word performance mean to your organization? When I hear the word performance I envision a Formula Race Car at the head of the pack or an Olympic athlete crossing the finish line. Thinking specifically of the finish line and high performance, I think of all the stages it took to get to the point of crossing the finish line as number one. When I think of high performing electrical or mechanical systems at work I realize whether in a refinery, offshore platform or in 5,000 feet of water sitting on the ocean floor, there are some common themes.

While subsea reliability programs have heavily relied on models and activities developed and mastered in manufacturing and refining, subsea reliability is forced into a philosophy that creates a systems approach in its operations. 

Systems reliability in subsea considers the degree of standardization in the equipment and in the tools used to repair and maintain the equipment. It allows for almost any operation to be suspended if operational limits are on the edge of being exceeded. Listed below are measures taken when limits are on the edge of being exceeded:
 

How often should PM strategies and tasks be reviewed?

The question is often asked “how often should PM strategies and tasks be reviewed?’"Here are 3 processes an organization should have in place to support PM reviews.

Root Cause Analysis  review:  Each time an RCA is performed on failed equipment a review of the maintenance strategy should also be performed.  The review of the maintenance strategy including the PM tasks should determine if a task exists that is supposed to prevent or identify early the incipient failure that ultimately led to the failure of the equipment. 

If a task exists it should be determined if the task was performed properly.  If the task was performed properly then the task should be changed as its ineffective.  If the task was not performed properly then training should be provided to so that the task will be performed properly in the future. If no task exists then one should be developed and added to the PM procedure and the maintenance strategy updated.

Design for Reliability - Part 2 of 4

Teaching the Millenials a sound reliability strategy early in their career (the Matures, Baby Boomers and Gen Xers too) can be the critical component of a strong manufacturing strategy. 

Millenials have been categorized as seeing the world as a union of people and countries connected electronically and technologically 365 days a year, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week; spending a lot of time interacting with social media and using more than one medium at a time, with parents that catered to their needs more than the rest of us.  Some see them as most times arrogant but, they may actually be the most productive, innovative generation in history (Sujansky, 2009).   What in the world does this have to do with reliability? – a lot.  Building a powerful brand comes with a strong reliability strategy.  Every organization, no matter what it may be manufacturing, requires a powerful and strong reliability strategy lined up with its corporate strategy. In today’s climate this includes being connected and collaborating 365 days a year, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week; spending a lot of time interacting with social media and using more than one medium at a time not only with the corporate strategy but with people, processes, programs, and performance beyond internal and external boundaries. Reliability has evolved from a reactive, "keep the failures quiet," enviroment brought on by pressures to meet production/manufacturing targets to the promotion and use of:

Can you predict and identify failure before it happens?

We recently had a comment posted on Tracy Strawn's blog post Preventive Maintenance - The Cost of Maintaining Equipment

Khaled Ekram asked the question: 


"What if we could identify failure before it happens with a reasonable time in which we could order the damaged parts and recieve it (within the lead time), if we could have a signal or alert for failure or measurment which could give an indication of failure propability we may save a lot of money by ordering within the perfect time.

Yes we may have a risk of not having the parts before the failure then we may face the shut-down and cost of non-availability for the items but we should try to do such in some cases.

Therefore if you could advise about my suggestion I would be appreciated."

Design for Reliability - Part 1 of 4

When I launched into the reliability profession, I thought condition monitoring was the center of the reliability universe. 

I was so focused on putting my hands on equipment to feel if it was running right or listening to it talk to me about its condition to determine when something was going to fail. The next step was ensuring my spare part was around.  It never occurred to me I may be able to prevent the failure from ever happening or at least extend the life of the component and system.  

I never thought of design improvements, manufacturing process or total system interfaces impacts to my failures, if I did it was a blame not a solution.  Budgets seem to be squeezed and limited for RCM and many times a lesson learned instead of a proactive event.   

I was frustrated with the design or at least what I thought was the design of many components and had no foresight to focus on a different type of bottom line. 

Continuing Education for Reliability Leaders

A "Round Table" Conference Call

August 23, 2011, five graduates of the Advanced Diploma in Maintenance and Reliability Management (MRM) participants gathered to discuss how things were going since graduating from Marshall Institute and North Carolina State University’s diploma program.

The Dollars-and-Cents of a CMMS

 

Guest Blog Contribution:

Marshall Institute is always looking to publish great industry relevant blog content and we are proud to have todays blog post come from MicroMain Corporation. MicroMain provides award-winning maintenance and facility management software and services to organizations worldwide.  Learn more about MicroMain.  

If you are interested in contributing valuable and relevent industry information to Marshall Institute's blog please contact us.  

CMMS Horror Stories: 5 Reasons a CMMS Implementation Can Fail

 

Guest Blog Contribution:

Marshall Institute is always looking to publish great industry relevant blog content and we are proud to have todays blog post come from MicroMain Corporation. MicroMain provides award-winning maintenance and facility management software and services to organizations worldwide.  Learn more about MicroMain.  

If you are interested in contributing valuable and relevent industry information to Marshall Institute's blog please contact us.  


As much as some CMMS vendors don’t like to admit it, not every CMMS implementation has been a resounding success.

United Skills of America - Close the Skills Gap with this App!

Want to join the movement of the United Skills of America?  

United Skills of America is striving to build the next generation of skilled technicians through a major campaign in concert with Career Technical Education programs, community college goals, and the Center for America.  This initiative is supported by United Association Union of Plumbers, Fitters, Welders and HVAC Service Techs, Robeson Community Col

lege of Lumberton, N.C., and technicians like Marty Tauber, a maintenance trainer of Portland, Maine.

Take a brief minute and try our Occupy a Job App - Yes, there is now an app for that too!

Sustaining TPM: Develop a Strategy

The final video in the Sustaining TPM series reviews the importance of establishing a both a short and long term strategy.   Creating a clear strategy plan is vital for any long term improvement effort to be sustained.  Studies such as the AT Kearney study and results from the NAME award recipients (North American Maintenance Excellence) show that the best of the best have both a 1 and 5 year strategy plans.

Greg highlights key elements for developing a sustainable strategy:

India's first Reliability Maintenance Council is formed

 

India

MUMBAI, INDIA -- The Indian Reliability Maintenance Council (IRMC)  was recently formed by the attendees of Joel Leonard’s February 2012 “Fighting the Maintenance Crisis Workshop”.  The impetus for forming the council was the enormous task of maintaining large, aging infrastructure and dealing with a long list of industrial challenges including: equipment failures, production outages, budget cuts, deferred maintenance expenses, skilled workforce challenges and increasing inflationary costs.

Sustaining TPM: Build Internal Expertise

So far, in the Sustaining TPM video series we have discussed the importance of gaining consensus on strengths and opportunities and building a persuasive case for change. This next and equally important topic is building internal expertise

For those currently embarking on your TPM implementation journey, let's assume you have successfully executed the first two steps. This means that your peers and management team are on board with the need for Total Productive Maintenance and also the current areas for opportunities that exist at your site. With this momentum built, it is vital to utilize individuals who are able and willing to drive the process. This is the step of building internal expertise.

On your journey you will require the sponsorship of corporate and you may seek the services of a consulting company; however valuable these people are, they cannot sustain your process. Sustaining the process comes from a sense of ownership, and this has to be developed at the shop floor.

 

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