MRM Participant Travels 156 hours to Attend Program!

Baba Salihi, of West Africa, recently graduated from Marshall Institute and NC State’s Maintenance and Reliability Management (MRM) Diploma Program.  To receive the diploma, participants must attend three classes/modules, successfully pass assessments, and complete homework.  Baba went beyond the call of duty by traveling 156 hours total from Akjoujt, north of Mauritania.  “Why would anyone do this?” you must wonder.  Baba explains that MRM is “one of the best maintenance training programs in the world!”  

Excerpts from an interview with Baba on how MRM made his travels totally worthwhile: 

Tell us what you do.

The Stores Stock Committee: Straightening Roads & Leveling Mountains

For this month’s blog, we are going to slow down just a little and spend some time discussing a nuance that will be critical for the storeroom to successfully advance fromeffective to efficient. For this transformation, we must have an active support structure to provide guidance, oversight, and clout, essentially straightening roads and leveling the mountains of obstacles that might impede progress.

Companies that have ventured into Total Process Reliability (TPR) with Marshall Institute will recognize the support structure necessity as being step 3 of the 8-phase change model.

Advance the Foundation of YOUR Effective Storeroom

Last month we discussed the processes and practices that are necessary for a storeroom to be effective at a very ‘foundational’ level.  Those specific activities are important as they are the building blocks of a world class MRO inventory process.  From here, we build upon the groundwork just laid and grow to an intermediate level of effectiveness, while continuing to develop processes that lead us to higher performance.

After the Intermediate-Effective processes, we’ll continue to build our practices until we are performing at or near a world class level.  Let me provide an early glimpse of all that goes into controlling maintenance inventory:

Effective and Efficient Processes and Practices

Table 1:  Effective and Efficient Processes and Practices

Becoming 'YOUR BEST' Maintenance Supervisor

 

“A real leader or supervisor’s success is not solely measured on their personal ability, but is better measured by the success of the team they lead. This success is based both on the personal and professional growth of the team they lead.” R. Scott Smith.

 

It can take years, if not decades, to realize the wisdom of the quote above. Becoming a great Maintenance Supervisor and demonstrating true leadership requires the mix of the right traits, skills that are honed through the years, and the maturity and humility to learn from mistakes.

Maintenance Supervisors are the front line of leadership; they are the ‘sharp end of the spear’!

Before your storeroom can be efficient, it must first be effective

Welcome back!  This month, we are going to discuss the initial step of making your maintenance storeroom effective.  We are often contacted by clients who tend to share a common vision and goal, asking “Can you help us make our storeroom more efficient?”  “Of course we can, that’s what we do!”  It’s usually during this first contact with the client that we’ll caution, “First, let’s make sure your storeroom is effective.” 

As I mentioned in January’s blog, I recommend that you begin the continuous improvement process of your maintenance inventory with a sense of where you are now (current state).  We have an extensive, thorough, and sometimes painful assessment, and also a tamer storeroom survey that can be used for such evaluations.  Those are the tools that we use, but in lieu of such formality, you should at least gain a sense of your current state by using any internal resource at your disposal.  Stores is a critical aspect of your reliability effort and you need to understand this element in order to move forward.

After an assessment, we can focus on the strategy of building an effective storeroom and then an efficient storeroom by following a concise and easy to navigate road map to reach a world class MRO storeroom.

Introduction to World Class Inventory Management

Welcome and thanks for visiting! This is the first edition in a 12-month series of blog entries, designed to discuss and explain high level storeroom performance. It should also help create a compelling case for change at your plant or location.


I’ll be writing a blog every month covering key challenges and discussions around Storeroom and Materials Management.  I welcome you to review the material and to comment below and let us know your experiences, thoughts, and points of view. Let’s have a conversation and some robust dialogue on this very important subject.

What does World Class mean?

As a reliability consultant, I use the term “World Class” often, and if you’ve had consultants in your facility or gone to any outside training, you’ve no doubt heard this phrase. It’s likely that our earliest exposure to the term came from the world of sports, as Olympians are said to be world class athletes. The Olympic motto “Citius, Altius, Fortius” convinces us that the participants are those among us who are “Faster, Higher, Stronger.”

Maintenance Planning & Scheduling Training: 3-steps to maximize your learning

In return for the ten minutes you will invest in reading this blog post, I promise that you will be able to make all future maintenance planning and scheduling training more meaningful and effective.  Sound like a great deal? 

So, why is this important,  you ask? After all, training is just training, right? Not for me, it isn’t. Training is a two way exchange in which you get what you give.  With these tips, what yougive to training will significantly improve what you get from training.  I am not talking about meager gains here; I am talking about potential life-altering transformation.  Let’s get started.

The three areas you can maximize your learning Return On Investment (ROI) are:

SMRP 2014 Conference Review

2014 SMRP Conference

I had the privilege of attending the 2014 SMRP conference(Society of Maintenance and Reliability Professionals) in Orlando a few weeks ago. I always look forward to this annual conference. I enjoy spending time at the Marshall Institute Booth with co-workers. It’s always great catching up with colleagues whom I don’t see too often as we all travel so much. Marshall Institute typically works with 30+ clients at any given time. One of the things I love most about my job is that it never gets old. Each client has their own set of goals and opportunities. We help them identify these opportunities, put a strategic plan together as to how to address these opportunities and help them achieve success through training, consulting, and coaching.

Get CMRP Exam Ready: 5 Tips to eliminate exam nerves

 

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Your accumulated experience in the field of maintenance reliability is, hands down, the best preparation you have for the CMRP Exam.  Study alone, without experience, is not enough to ensure a passing score.  Here are some ideas from maintenance reliability experts who took and passed the CMRP.

1. Try to Answer the Question, “How Ready Am I Really?

Assess your current understanding of exam concepts by reviewing the CMRP Exam Body of Knowledge and Certification Guidelines.  Take SMRP’s sample test (www.smrp.org) to see how prepared you are.  From there, you can develop a list of gaps to better target your study.  

Process Safety Management Webinar

On February 13th, 2014 Marshall Institute conducted a 1-hour free webinar on the topic of Process Safety Management (PSM).   The webinar, presented by senior consultant John Ross, covers the elements of PSM as it relates to both companies that handle highly hazardous chemicals and those who do not but would benefit from adopting some key practices and behaviors of PSM.   John emphasizes the importance of PSM as an organization-wide focus.  

This webinar is valuable for both current PSM practitioners and newbies. The recorded webinar is now available.  Click on the image below to begin the recording.   If you have questions or feedback following from watching the recording please leave messages in the comment boxes below. 

 

The History and Purpose of PSM-NEP

 
reccomendedreading   It is recommend that you read John Ross' article      "Making Sense of Proces Safety" posted by Plant Engineering before reading this blog post. 

Process Safety Management was initiated by OSHA in 1992 as a way to respond with government oversight of industries using Highly Hazardous Chemicals (HHCs).  Events prior to that date, involving the infrequent release of HHCs had sometimes resulted in catastrophic damage, injuries, and even death.  Clearly, unchecked processes added to a volatile situation sometimes make things worse; much worse.

PM Optimization as a Routine

Anyone that has ever tended or raised livestock , be it rabbits, chickens, goats or cattle, knows that routines are important.  Without routines, you run the risk of causing   undue suffering on the part of your animals or end up with a monumental mess to clean up.

Unfortunately, when Preventive Maintenance Optimization (PMO) is considered, most people immediately revert, in their mind, to the concept of a workshop.  However, the fact is that the most effective form of PMO is that which takes place incrementally, over time, via routines and feedback.

One of the  routines  involves regularly scheduling a planned PM.  Planned, meaning that the conduct and materials involved in the PM are well laid out and itemized.  Scheduled, meaning that this work was known, at least 72 hours in advance.

Another routine that optimizes the PM is the routine of feedback. The feedback of your maintenance personnel is the most valuable form of intelligence reinforcing the continuous improvement of your maintenance systems.

Where to Start? Building a World Class MRO Process

In practice, it’s easier to ‘build’ a world class MRO process from one that is mature and functioning, rather than from scratch.  Consider your process that has been inefficiently working for years; delivery both poor service and great inconvenience.  This is truly a more enviable position than starting with an empty warehouse.

Why?  Think of all the great examples you already have of “how not to do something”.  Thomas Edison so cleverly stated that he didn’t have thousands of failed experiments when creating a light bulb; he just learned 10,000 ways not to do it.

We’ll save you 9,991 attempts by giving you a 9 step outline to use in building a world class MRO process.   It’s like flipping a switch; after all, what could be easier?

Step 1:  Conduct a parts needs analysis

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